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Hurrian Cities Books LLC

Hurrian Cities

Books LLC

Published May 22nd 2010
ISBN : 9781156629727
Paperback
48 pages
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 About the Book 

Chapters: Harran. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 47. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: HarranMoreChapters: Harran. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 47. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Harran (Akkadian: Ancient Greek: Latin: ) is a district of anlurfa Province in the southeast of Turkey. A very ancient city which was a major Assyrian commercial, cultural, and religious center, Harran is a valuable archaeological site. It is often identified with Haran, the place in which Abraham lived before he reached Canaan, and with the Haran of Ezekiel 27:23, a city which traded with Tyre. One of Harrans specialties was the odoriferous gum derived from the stobrum tree. The city was the chief home of the Mesopotamian moon god Sin, under the Assyrians and Neo-Babylonians/Chaldeans and even into Roman times. Carrhae is a defunct ancient town on the site, and gave its name to the Battle of Carrhae (53 BC), fought between the Roman Republic and the Parthian Empire. Harrans ruins date from Assyrian, Roman, Mandean/Sabian, and Arab Islamic Caliphate times. T. E. Lawrence surveyed the site, and an AngloTurkish excavation was begun in 1951, ending in 1956 with the death of D. S. Rice. The district is near the border with Syria, 24 miles (44 kilometers) southeast of the city of anlurfa, the former Edessa, at the end of a long straight road across the hot plain of Harran. In its prime Harran was a major Assyrian city which controlled the point where the road from Damascus joins the highway between Nineveh and Carchemish. This location gave Harran strategic value from an early date. It is frequently mentioned in Assyrian inscriptions as early as the time of Tiglath-Pileser I, about 1100 BC, under the name Harranu (Akkadian harrnu, road, path- campaign, journey). After the Suppiluliuma IShattiwaza treaty (14th century BC) between the Hittite Empire and Mitanni, Harran was burned by a Hittite ar...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=85547